THE D3 GROUP NEWS

News & Meetings: IAPD-Santiago congress a success

Team D3Gat IAPD Santiago

December, 2017

IAPD's world congress on paediatric dentistry was a wonderful event,
both in itself and for exposure of D3G. Molar Hypomin received unprecedented attention in the lecture halls – that is, two 2-hour
sessions back to back and both jam-packed with about 600 delegates. Vidal Perez and Mike Hubbard each presented scientifically-flavoured
talks, and translational research was the focus of another talk given by Mike. Subsequent discussions led to many pleasing advances including pledges for further collaboration with IAPD's exec, new members from across the globe, support for the "Spanish Sam" storybook translation initiative, and many other offers of help. The new "I love D3G" membership badges were snapped up, and the promotions team (wearing matching 'I love D3G' T-shirts) were kept busy providing information, signing up members and selling Sam's storybook. Some photos from this event are here.


D3 In The Clinic: Hypomin and caries in 2-year molars

D3 In The Clinic Pic

December, 2017

Disentangling enamel defects from childhood caries is a "clinical snake pit", yet postgrad student Marilyn Owen and colleagues jumped right in with a well-designed study of Melbourne preschoolers. In their high-socioeconomic population, 1-in-7 children had hypomineralised 2-year molars (HM-Es), a third of which were affected severely. Severe HM-E cases generally had multiple teeth affected by relatively large, yellow-brown opacities and although statistics were hampered by low caries prevalence (only 13% of children had dentinal cavities), a significant association was found between opacity size and caries severity in HM-Es. The surprising finding that HM-Es had little impact on overall caries prevalence matches recent reports for 6-year molars in low-caries populations (read more here).


D3 In The Lab: Resin bonding & Molar Hypomin

D3 In The Lab Pic

December, 2017

Failure of resin bonding to hypomineralised enamel remains a common clinical complaint. Previous studies have shown that hypomin enamel contains more protein than normal and that chemical pretreatment
with hypochlorite bleach improves its resin-bond strength. Realising potential safety benefits over hypochlorite, Mani Ekambaram and colleagues tested a natural protein-degrading enzyme gel and found it
to be equally effective as hypochlorite on hypomin enamel, increasing bond strengths to about 90% of the normal-enamel level. Given that the enzyme gel has previously been recommended for removal of carious dentine, further investigation of its utility for hypomin teeth appears worthwhile (read more here).

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2017

'Spanish Sam' storybook translation initiative launched

October, 2017

Being hosted in Latin America, the IAPD congress was an ideal opportunity to gather support for translating 'Sam's story' into Spanish. Tempted by a flyer (see here) and mock book cover in Spanish, delegates from numerous Spanish-speaking countries offered to help with fundraising, translation and distribution. Requests were made for other languages too, so hopefully Sam's story can grow to become both a useful educational tool around the world and a serious fundraiser for D3G's research ambitions. Thanks to Vidal Perez and colleagues for the Spanish translation work and their willingness to help coordinate this important venture.


'D3 Snack' – a foray into continuing education

October, 2017

With the 'D3 family' now enriched with healthcare professionals wanting "continuing education" (CE, or CPD), it was timely to start a CE program as part of D3G's individual membership scheme (below). D3G is uniquely positioned to offer CE that is both D3-centric and scientifically robust, being founded by a scientist and having a comprehensive online-education resource on tap. An experimental "D3 snack" concept, involving short learn+test modules that can quite literally be completed during a 15-minute office break, is now being consumer-tested. Moreover, an updated format for the D3G Dispatch newsletter includes various "academic" elements (quiz, literature mini-reviews, latest D3 publications) to complement this advance.


Individual member subscription launched

October, 2017

Following successful introduction of basic email membership (see here), an individual membership subscription to D3G was launched at the IAPD congress. This subscription package offers globally-unique educational and scientific information about D3s through a regular e-newsletter ('D3G Dispatch'), an hour of D3-flavoured continuing education, discounted entry to D3G events, and a membership pin on our 'D3 family map'. We're thrilled to now have our first international subscribers on board, representing a dozen countries.


International Ambassador for D3G for named

October, 2017

As part of our International Friends initiative (see here), we're proud to name Vidal Perez (University of Talca, Chile) as D3G's first international ambassador. Deeply aware of the Molar Hypomin problem in South America, Vidal came to Melbourne to do a translationally-crafted PhD with Mike Hubbard's group. His work led to a research award, a breakthrough publication about D3G, and several other forthcoming papers. Now back in his homeland, Vidal intends to foster D3 family growth across Latin America.


World-first 'Champions for chalky teeth'

August, 2017

In another world-first for D3G, and after February saw the pilot "We Fight Chalky Teeth" co-branded practice go online in Tasmania (see here), three more practices have joined in to create a budding network of D3-championing practices. And to enrich public-friendliness, we created a new "chalky molar"-inspired logo and tagline ("Champions in the fight against chalky teeth") for the Campaign landing site – thanks to Sharon Dunn for the cool design work. It is hoped this initiative will improve public and professional awareness of D3s, facilitate access to D3G educational materials, and provide financial support for D3 research and education. Read more here.


Improved restoration of hypomin molars with GIC

August, 2017

Now back practising in Chile, Melbourne PhD graduate Vidal Perez reports a novel approach to improving the robustness of GIC restorations in severely hypomineralised molars. After filling the tooth with GIC, an orthodontic band was fitted as a strong metallic casing. Orthodontic bands are thought to be less harmful on gums when compared with stainless steel crowns (a commonly used approach). After 18 months observation, the gums were in good condition and the restoration remained essentially intact – something that would normally be unexpected for a GIC filling of that size. It will be interesting to see if these findings hold up beyond the single case reported (read more here).


Resin infiltration of hypomineralised enamel

August, 2017

Delving deeper into the attractive but (so-far) vexed proposition of using low viscosity resin to harden hypomineralised enamel, Melbourne postgraduate student Harleen Kumar asked whether reliability of resin infiltration could be improved by removal of the surface enamel layer. Using polarised light microscopy, the surface layer was found to vary widely in thickness and its removal by acid etching was also variable. With subsequent resin penetration remaining unreliable (i.e. some success in about half of lesions studied) and adding little if any hardness, it was concluded that this approach cannot be recommended as a clinical procedure currently (read more here).


D3G's winter family gathering, Melbourne

August, 2017

Unfortunately, due to unforeseen circumstances, the scientific networking meeting and gala fundraiser events have been postponed. We will advertise the new arrangements as soon as possible.


A publication milestone for D3G and more

August, 2017

This month's publication of the first academic report about D3G's approach to the Molar Hypomin problem (free download here) constitutes an important milestone, not just for D3G but hopefully for the field and ultimately child health too. Until now, translational channels (websites, lectures, mass media) have been used to report D3G's advances and obtain valuable feedback from across the sector. This departure from tradition was driven by necessity, reflecting academia's generally weak grasp on Molar Hypomin and the need for translational approaches to fix it. Stemming from a "call to arms for enamel researchers" (see here), this article seeks to rally broader research attention around Molar Hypomin which is outlined translationally for the first time as a 3-level problem. Translational terms and several other "D3-isms" developed in collaboration with the D3G community are introduced to the academic literature for the first time. It's also noteworthy that the D3G website is used heavily for referencing, aiming translationally to assist non-academic readers.

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'D3G Dispatch' – a newsletter at last!!

August, 2017

Strong families depend on great communication – therefore a priority for 2017 has been putting mechanisms in place for this and related matters to happen effectively. So, with communications and membership foundations in place (see here and here), Sharon has turned to crafting a newsletter that is translationally suited for our broad variety of members. The first issue of "D3G Dispatch" has been....umm....dispatched to Joined Up members in a trial two-device format (i.e. quick read on mobile, and longer PDF version for tablet/print). Once we've caught up on the major backlog of news and achievements, we plan to add educational items about D3 research as a stepping stone to future "Continuing Education" offerings.

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D3G as a role model for translational research

July, 2017

An article arising from last year's International Symposium on Enamel (see here), which recommends priorities and directions for future research in the enamel field, emphasises both the need for stronger research efforts into Molar Hypomin and the allied translational opportunities offered by D3G. Furthermore, D3G is held up as a pioneering model for translation that could be adapted to other problem areas. A free download of this article is available here (disclosure: Mike Hubbard is a totally biased senior author).

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A branding refresh for D3G

June, 2017

We're really happy that the "D3 brand" draws numerous compliments from many directions and so we're keen to continue developing it – as always, tips and suggestions are welcomed from all our stakeholders. Most obviously, Sharon has designed a chalky-molar logo for the Chalky Teeth Campaign and also adapted it for the We fight chalky teeth practices network where "Toothy" was employed as flagwaver for the new tagline "Champions in the fight against chalky teeth". The "love D3G" concept was also picked up for D3G membership and "Toothy" was used to inspire people to gift memberships ("pay it forward") to others in less-fortunate circumstances. And eagle-eyes may have noticed that Sharon recently renovated the D3G logo, aiming to increase its public appeal.

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World peak for dental hygienists endorses D3G

June, 2017

D3G is honoured to receive endorsement from the International Federation of Dental Hygienists which represents over 82,000 members worldwide – many of whom serve at the frontline for detecting D3s in children. IFDH joins the International Association of Paediatric Dentists as our second world-peak endorser and we hope that the complementarity between these two organisations (from D3 perspective) can be harnessed to advance appreciation of D3 issues and D3G's efforts worldwide. We thank President Robyn Watson for prioritising this key endorsement.

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Broader clinical representation for D3G

June, 2017

While paediatric dentists undoubtedly play a crucial role in the D3 field and so have dominated academic and clinical thinking, we felt it was time to better acknowledge the key parts played by other areas of the dental sector. So, alongside David Manton (a paediatric dentist and D3G's founding co-director), we're now proud to welcome Paul Schneider (orthodontist and co-founder of MRUFD) and Julie Satur (dental therapist/hygienist) as lead academic clinicians for D3G. We encourage people from these disciplines to share their "D3 thoughts and wishes" with our clinical leads.

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D3G-ANZ becomes the global hub and 'D3G Down Under'

May, 2017

With the wonderful expansion of our D3 family to include International Friends came the need to rebadge our Antipodean core as "the hub" of a global effort. And with Australia and New Zealand known by many as "the land Down Under", what could be better for this purpose than "D3G Down Under"? Well perhaps something that doesn't attract the standard jokes about "down underwear?" and "downunder in the mouth?"...but that's something we're prepared to work around!

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'International Friends' group launched

May, 2017

Long-term international interest in D3G plus the wonderful reception Mike Hubbard received overseas recently (see here, here and here) has spurred the introduction of an International Friends subgroup and membership entitlement. At launch, 22 countries are represented by 60 friends comprising scientists, dentists, company folk plus a D3-affected family. This expansion brings with it the exciting opportunity to start thinking about what we might accomplish together as a broader collective, and also to ask what is needed to get there? Accordingly, to generate a more-globalised perspective about how best our D3 community can develop, we've added a public "Suggestions Board" to collect ideas and wishes from around the world.

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Company support for D3G at Australian Dental Congress

May, 2017

Two of D3G's supporting companies kindly waved D3G's flag at Australian Dental Congress, the biennial mega-meeting for Australian dentists held this year in Melbourne. As part of their promotion of a filling material often used on Hypomin teeth, GC advertised their association with D3G and generously donated us a slice of that month's sales. And aiming to encourage broader uptake across general dentistry, Colgate purchased 100 Sam storybooks and distributed them from their stand. We thank GC and Colgate for these family-spirited initiatives.

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D3G offers 'nearly free' basic membership with 'Pay it forward'

May, 2017

With an "eShop" now available (see here), the next step in our self-sustainability agenda was to upgrade from regular emails to an efficient communications system. Sharon has worked her design magic in establishing a Join D3G portal that includes a "Pay-it-Forward" option for those socially driven types wanting to Share D3 Love. For starters, we've opened an "Almost-Free Basic Membership" category to cover simple email communications and get a regular newsletter underway – once the newsletter and other value-add features are in place, we intend to offer higher levels of membership by subscription. Although D3G membership has been free up till now, the time has come to move from reliance on charity into cost-recovery mode. And to help existing users adapt to this change, we've started with a very low bar – just A$5 to cover the external cost of our new communications system.

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A chalky teeth makeover at www.thed3group.org

April, 2017

With the Chalky Teeth Campaign landing site (see here) now attracting strong traffic and new endorsements, we felt it was time to merge this "public entry point" with the main D3G website more seamlessly. Hence, the latter has been given a makeover by introducing the public-friendly "chalky terms" (chalky teeth, chalky molars, chalky enamel spots) into appropriate areas of the KIDS and FAMILY sections. Most importantly, the new "What are chalky teeth?" page explains that, in having no fixed meaning, this colloquialism is a translationally useful device for starting conversations with the public before leading them into more explicit professional terminology.

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Paediatric dentists support the Chalky Teeth Campaign

April, 2017

We are thrilled that AAPD, the Australasian peak body for specialist paediatric dentists, has come on board as financial supporters of the Chalky Teeth Campaign. AAPD endorsed D3G's website at launch in 2013 and many of its members have since made invaluable in-kind contributions to our ongoing activities. We look forward to furthering our collaborative efforts "towards better understanding and care of people with D3s". Presidents Philippa Sawyer and Bernadette Drummond are thanked sincerely for making this important step happen.

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D3G's new e-commerce facility

April, 2017

Kicking off our self-sustainability agenda, new project manager Sharon Dunn (see here) has added a customised e-commerce facility ("eShop") into the D3G website. Initial offerings are Sam's storybook (separately targeting families and practitioners), D3G referral cards and a forthcoming basic membership. Early indications are that this long-awaited facility will be a win-win for customers and D3G operations.

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D3G at ANZSPD meeting in NZ

March, 2017

Stopping over in Auckland on his way back from IADR, Mike Hubbard was pleased to wave D3G's flag amongst the wide range of child-centric practitioners and company folk at ANZSPD's RK Hall lecture meeting. Many helpful discussions were had and lots of D3G materials distributed. Thanks to Marilyn Owen for representing the We Fight Chalky Teeth practice initiative (see here) and to ANZSPD president Tim Johnston for sponsoring D3G's table.

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D3G's first offshore network meeting

March, 2017

Spurred by burgeoning interest in internationalising D3G plus a timely gathering of researchers (IADR General Session), our first offshore network meeting was held on Friday 24th March at an Irish pub in San Francisco. Over a scrummy pub lunch, the launch of overseas membership in D3G ("International friends of D3G") was toasted and ideas exchanged about what should come next. Read more here.

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D3G at IADR General Session in San Francisco

March, 2017

Encouraged by positivity received from researchers during his overseas trip last year (see here and here), Mike Hubbard followed up with a much broader audience attending IADR's General Session. Numerous discussions were had with researchers, journal editors and company folk, leading to a more rounded impression of how best D3G might serve a broader international audience. Mike also gave a lecture on "chalky teeth" lecture and a research seminar at UCSF's School of Dentistry, hosted by enamel scientist colleague Pamela Den Besten.

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A project manager for D3G

March, 2017

Already famous as D3G's website designer and illustrator of Sam's storybook, Sharon Dunn has stepped up to a broader project management and secretarial role. Until now, D3G's founder Mike Hubbard has been running the show almost single-handedly "after hours". However, with workload blossoming beyond his and other volunteers' capacity to deliver, a steady pair of helping hands has become essential. Generously, Sharon is working at a discounted rate to "give D3G a helping hand" – but as primary breadwinner and with a young child, she does need to be paid. It is hoped that by putting Sharon's design skills to good effect across various revenue-generating opportunities, her position will soon become self-supporting.

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Aussie hygienists support the Chalky Teeth Campaign

March, 2017

Following their 2015 endorsement of D3G (see here), Australia's peak body for dental hygienists (Dental Hygienists' Association of Australia) has kindly "upgraded" to become financial supporters of the Chalky Teeth Campaign. We thank DHAA and President Melanie Hayes for their keen interest and support, and look forward to working together to increase D3 awareness.

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ANOTHER MILESTONE FOR THE D3G WEBSITE

March, 2017

The "three million hits" milestone was passed in February, reflecting interest from around the world. Usage continues to climb (now averaging 250 visits per day) and Sam's storybook has been downloaded over 5,200 times. Most traffic comes from Australia, USA and UK but with many other countries not far behind it appears D3G's impact is spreading.

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World-first "We Fight Chalky Teeth" practice

February, 2017

In another world-first for D3G, February saw the first "We Fight Chalky Teeth" co-branded practice go online at Tassie Kids Dental. With so many practitioners praising the D3G website, an obvious next-step was to connect the Chalky Teeth Campaign (CTC) with practice websites via a CTC satellite page. And because "the fight against tooth decay" slogan enjoys universal recognition, we thought it logical to extend a "battle" metaphor to the world of chalky teeth (thanks to Garry Nervo for this idea). Hence "We Fight Chalky Teeth" was born as an informative and self-explanatory catchphrase for dental practitioners concerned about state-of-the-art management of D3s. This in turn led to a new logo for the practice homepage and stationery. It is hoped that, by bringing in other D3G supporters, a broadly beneficial network of D3-savvy practices can be established.

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Growing links with the AI community

January, 2017

Following up on bonding with the AI (amelogenesis imperfecta) community at last November's Enamel symposium (see here), D3G's Mike Hubbard was honoured to host Susan Parekh (Kings College, London) when she visited Melbourne this month. Besides her longstanding role in managing AI cases from across the UK, Susan is highly aware about Molar Hypomin and D3G's efforts to engage translationally across the sector. Discussions ended with the hope firstly that Susan could work with other D3-savvy colleagues to improve D3G's visibility in the UK, and secondly that D3G could increase its engagement with the AI community globally.

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2016

International support for D3G

November, 2016

On the back of his trip to the Enamel 9 Symposium, Mike Hubbard visited several "key opinion leaders" to gauge international interest in growing D3G beyond its current Australia+NZ scope. Discussions were had in the USA (Rebecca Slayton, Wendy Cheney, Colgate), UK (Nicola Innes, Mike Harrison, Susan Parekh) and France (Sylvie Babajko, Ariane Berdal), and D3G-centric lectures delivered in Boston, London and Paris. Opinions were overwhelmingly positive and while resourcing struggles remained the elephant in the room, it was felt that further internationalisation would be helpful in this regard.

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D3G saluted at International Symposium on Enamel

November, 2016

D3G was strongly represented at the 9th International Symposium on Tooth Enamel held this month in Harrogate, England. Vidal Perez presented biochemical findings from his PhD, attracting much interest in an overlooked aspect of enamel hardening. And in an enamel pathology session he chaired, Mike Hubbard rounded out several talks about Molar Hypomin by overviewing D3G's translational efforts and making a "call to arms" for enamel researchers – surprisingly, unlike amelogenesis imperfecta and dental fluorosis, Molar Hypomin has attracted little attention from enamel scientists before now. The subsequent discussion session went way overtime, and conversations continued for the remainder of the meeting. D3G was also involved in a workshop considering an international network for enamel geneticists. Those discussions brought us one step closer to the foundational hope that D3G could serve an umbrella role for interfacing various D3s with the public and politicians.

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Educational grant from NZ Dental Association

October, 2016

D3G has won a grant from NZDA's Waikato Bay of Plenty branch to provide educational materials for dental professionals and affected families in their region. Fronted by D3G's local representative, Katie Ayers, the grant enabled supply of 500 educational packages (comprising Sam's storybook, website referral cards, GC patient brochures and Colgate kiddie stickers). We thank GC and Colgate for supporting this initiative, and NZDA-WBOP for handling the local distribution.

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Australian Dental Students endorse D3G

October, 2016

We're thrilled to have the Australian Dental Student Association join their NZ counterparts (see here) as endorsers of D3G. Naturally it is hoped that the next generation of dental professionals have a better understanding of D3 issues than their predecessors – we look forward to working collaboratively with ADSA towards this goal. We thank the ADSA president Cheryl Chen, past presidents (Mohit Tolani, Audrey Irish), Velanni Martins and several other members of ADSA for supporting the various steps that led this endorsement.

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D3G referral cards updated for Chalky Teeth Campaign

August, 2016

Following successful uptake of both the new "family-friendly" website referral cards (see here), and the Chalky Teeth Campaign landing site (see here) we decided it was time to merge these two advances. So D3G's referral cards now list both website addresses, letting families be directed to the chalky teeth site, and from there onto appropriate parts of the main website. The new cards are available from the secretary.

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D3s and caries in primary teeth

July, 2016

Addressing caries risk associated with D3s in the primary dentition, Kim Seow and colleagues from Queensland recently reported a ground-breaking longitudinal study that followed children from birth through to 6-years old. Enamel hypoplasia and severe Molar Hypomin (yellow/brown opacities undergoing surface breakdown) were associated with 4.5 to 6-fold higher incidence of caries. About 10% of 725 children studied had at least one tooth affected by D3 and their caries developed much earlier than in teeth lacking D3s (read more here). These findings strengthen the evidential base for our Chalky Teeth Campaign.

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Australian dental students swot up on chalky teeth

July, 2016

At invitation of the conference organisers, director Mike Hubbard lectured on "the chalky teeth problem" at the Australian Dental Students Association's annual convention, held this year in Melbourne. Beyond the formal opportunity to put D3G's spin on things, it was wonderful to discuss Molar Hypomin with many students and learn not just how patchy their understanding is, but also to get some insights as to why (e.g. some tutors denying or downplaying the problem). We thank the organisers and previous ADSA reps for their interest over the past couple of years that prompted this opportunity.

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Public health exposure for D3G's translational education model

May, 2016

Building on recent linkages with the public health sector (see here), director Mike Hubbard lectured at the Public Oral Health Innovations conference hosted in Melbourne by Dental Health Services Victoria. His talk, which discussed the Chalky Teeth Campaign as being a new educational system for patients and practitioners, is available online (video here).

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2015

Research award for D3G PhD student

December, 2015

Winner of this year's Colgate-ANZSPD research award was Vidal Perez, a Chilean paediatric dentist studying for a PhD in Melbourne (see here). [August 2014] Competing against a variety of fabulous presentations, Vidal's engaging description of his biochemical investigations into the pathogenesis of chalky enamel won the day, helped perhaps by closing remarks expressing intent to spread his "Australasian D3 family" experiences across Latin America. Vidal graduated in December, with his thesis earning a commendation for the Chancellor's Prize at the University of Melbourne. Pictures here.

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Technical turmoil with D3G website

November, 2015

After nearly 3 years operation without missing a beat, the D3G website hit a wall due to a technical "innovation" introduced by our service provider – simply put, a feature our site depended on was no longer supported. Rather than rework the website, we decided to change service providers. Our sincere thanks to our website guru Suzanne Thomson for dropping everything and sorting this all out in amazingly short time (down 25/11, back up 27/11).

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Chalky Teeth Campaign landing site launched

November, 2015

With the Chalky Teeth Campaign idea taking off, it was decided to develop a landing site of the same name as a public entry point to the main D3G website. The new site was launched by ANZSPD president John Sheahan at the society's recent conference in Adelaide. With its easily remembered address (www.chalkyteeth.org), summary of the problem, and streamlined links to topics of lay interest, we hope this site will become a focal point for public awareness raising. We thank the University of Melbourne for funding support (public engagement grant).

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Inaugural 'D3G table' at ANZSPD conference

November, 2015

After a career of standing on the customer side of the table at trade shows, the "table turned" for director Mike Hubbard at ANZSPD's biennial conference in Adelaide where for the first time D3G had a display table. On display were Sam's storybook, D3G referral cards and flyers about the websites and an upcoming D3G supporting practice initiative, plus the compulsory clipboard for registrations of interest. A busy time was had, with Mike's PR efforts kindly supported by Vidal Perez and Elissa McElroy. The organising committee is thanked for hosting D3G's display at no charge.

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An online tribute to Grace Suckling, D3G's founding patron

November, 2015

Honouring Grace Suckling's remarkable life, D3G was proud to launch an online tribute that puts her research into a translational context. Drawing on material assembled for the 2013 event where Grace became our founding patron (see here), this new page presents both a listing of her research publications and a categorical recompilation that highlights the wide-reaching nature of her work – across lab, clinic and populations. A full-length version of Grace's interview with Erin Mahoney is also now available.

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Vale Elizabeth Waters

October, 2015

D3G respectfully acknowledges the passing of Elizabeth Waters (University of Melbourne), whose many interests in child health extended to providing guidance for our Chalky Teeth Campaign.

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ANZSPD supports the Chalky Teeth Campaign

October, 2015

Following their 2013 endorsement of D3G (see here), Australia's peak body for child-centric dental professionals (Australian and NZ Society of Paediatric Dentistry) has kindly "upgraded" to become financial supporters of the Chalky Teeth Campaign. We thank ANZSPD and President John Sheahan for their keen interest and support, and look forward to working together to increase D3 awareness.

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D3G referral cards for ADOHTA conference delegates

September, 2015

We are grateful to ADOHTA for distributing D3G website referral cards and flyers to delegates at their 50th anniversary congress held recently in Melbourne.

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Farewell to Grace Suckling, our Patron

August, 2015

After a remarkable life spanning 93 years, Grace Webster Suckling (b. 22/1/22) passed away on July 20th in Waikanae (near Wellington, NZ). Trained as a dentist in Dundee, Scotland, Grace practised in the UK before moving to NZ in 1956. After raising her family, she joined the Dental Research Unit in Wellington and, at the age of 50, started researching developmental defects of enamel (DDE) in sheep. A stunning 29 research papers later, she had not only spawned the DDE index but also produced what remains today an unsurpassed and rock-solid contribution to terminology, diagnosis and aetiology (i.e. DDE epidemiology and pathogenesis, enamel biophysics, fluorosis and tetracycline staining). In becoming our Patron (see August 2013, below), Grace was interviewed by D3G-NZ rep, Erin Mahoney (clips). We plan to bring the full interview, and other remembrances of Grace's fabulous and oft-overlooked gems, to this website shortly. From doyen of DDE to patron of D3G, thankyou, and rest in peace Grace Suckling.

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USA exposure for D3G's chalky teeth message

July, 2015

D3G's director Mike Hubbard was invited to present the Chalky Teeth message at a "scientific showcase" meeting in Canberra attended by the USA ambassador to Australia, John Berry. This golden opportunity, which originated from Mike's alumni status with the USA National Institutes of Health, was secured by the organisers interest in D3G as a groundbreaking example of a translational research network. Mike's talk played on the surprising lack of USA studies about Molar Hypomin and ensuing prospects for USA-Australasian partnerships in research and education. A pleasing level of positive feedback was received from both the official party and other presenters.

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D3G's "Sam's helping hand" fundraiser

July, 2015

Facing increasing workload and dwindling finances, several D3G members got together and organised a "Sam's helping hand" fundraiser in time for the end-of-financial-year giving period. We are grateful to our partner organisations (AAPD, ANZSPD, RACDS) for helping spread the word across their memberships, and of course to those who donated.

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Strong D3G presence at the IAPD Congress in Glasgow

June, 2015

Besides the usual participation by many D3G members, this year's biennial worldwide meeting of paediatric dentists features a D3-themed talk by Melbourne PhD candidate, Vidal Perez, and D3G promotional materials in delegate's bags (all 1,700 of them!). Vidal will outline how the "D3 family" has helped his molecular investigations into the pathology of "chalky enamel", and invite people to attend the next IAPD congress being held in his home country, Chile. Our thanks to ANZSPD, IAPD, and Vidal's travel sponsors for making this important exposure possible.

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D3G referral cards for Australian dental students

June, 2015

We are grateful to ADSA for distributing D3G website referral cards and flyers to delegates at their annual congress held recently in Cairns.

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Improving epidemiological investigation of Molar Hypomin

June, 2015

Teaming up with two MIH stalwarts, Melbourne academics Aghareed Ghanim and David Manton have admirably broached two troubling topics in the Hypomin field. First, the need for better standardisation of epidemiological studies (and allied aetiology) is argued, and a statistical basis for sample sizing offered. Second, standardised scoring and charting regimes are suggested, in essence being further adaptations of the DDE index that emanated from studies by our patron Grace Suckling ("atypical fillings/extraction", review). Although D3G offers a different perspective on several details, the general principles of these arguments clearly need to be heeded (read more here and here).

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Resin infiltration of hypomineralised enamel

June, 2015

Following the illustrious footsteps of Rami Farah, Otago postgraduate student Arun Natarajan applied a new approach to characterise the composition of Hypomin enamel. Teaming up with experts from Chemistry and Mathematics, Raman microscopy was used to chemically map "chalky" lesions, and then the effects of different resin infiltration procedures were examined. Pretreatments (acid, protein removal) improved Hypomin enamel properties (in most cases) and resin penetration (in most cases). The exceptions, plus evidence that clinically similar "brown opacities" diverged at chemical level, offer multiple possibilities why a Melbourne group had found such resin treatments to be inconsistent (read more here and here).

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Another milestone for the D3G website

June, 2015

Having passed "one million hits" last November, www.thed3group.org has now reached a new milestone by hosting its 100,000th visitor. Usage continues to climb (now averaging 180 visits per day) and Sam's storybook has been downloaded 4,000 times. It appears D3G's impact is spreading, both in Australasia and beyond.

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ADOHTA to distribute D3G referral cards

June, 2015

With high demand following our recent Chalky Teeth promotion, ADOHTA has kindly agreed to distribute website referral cards to their members on behalf of D3G. This family-spirited move provides much-needed relief for the D3G secretariat. We thank ADOHTA president Hellene Platell for sanctioning this pioneering step.

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Chalky Teeth promotion to Australian therapists

May, 2015

Thanks to sponsorship by the ANZSPD, all ADOHTA members will receive a glossy copy of Sam's storybook along with website referral cards and a sheet of the Colgate-D3G reward stickers. With therapists playing such a key role in identifying "Hypomin kids" and educating their families, this generous initiative from the paediatric dentistry community exemplifies the "family ethos" of D3G. We thank presidents John Sheahan (ANZSPD) and Hellene Platell (ADOHTA), and Colgate, for colloborating with D3G on this milestone project.

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NZ orthodontists treat local therapists to Sam's story

May, 2015

Having received a glossy copy of the Sam book at the NZAO conference, orthodontist Betty Keng obtained a further 50 copies to give to school therapists in her region (Taranaki). On hearing this fabulous example of "D3 family spirit", two other orthodontists (Mark Ewing, Sax Dearing) did the same thing for their respective regions (Waikato, Hawkes Bay). We thank Betty, Mark and Sax for pioneering this wonderful initiative, and for their allied donations to D3G.

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Strong D3G presence at the NZ orthodontists' biennial conference in Napier

April, 2015

Building from a D3G-themed presentation by Nina Vasan in 2013, three D3G stalwarts (Erin Mahoney, Paul Schneider, Mike Hubbard) gave "world-first" interlinked talks about Molar Hypomin from paediatric dental, orthodontic and D3G+scientific aspects, respectively. And delegates were treated to a glossy copy of Sam's storybook thanks to sponsorship by NZAO. We were thrilled to find so many Kiwis clued-up about the orthodontic aspects of Hypomin and already using our website. Thanks to NZAO for providing this opportunity.

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GC+D3G Molar Hypomin brochures prove popular

March, 2015

GC's education+marketing brochure for Molar Hypomin families, developed collaboratively with D3G (see December 2013 news, below), is proving highly popular. Since GC's initial distribution of 8,000 copies across Australasian dental practices, a further 12,000 copies have been requested by practitioners (available through Henry Schein at no cost). The partner brochure for dental practitioners continues to be available online.

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Sam's story is at the Australian Dental Congress

March, 2015

The Chalky Teeth Campaign marches on, this time to Brisbane where 3,000 glossy copies of Sam's storybook will be distributed to delegates, along with the website referral card. D3G warmly thanks GC Australasia for sponsoring this promotion, and ADA for their support.

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Public health exposure for D3G's chalky teeth message

February, 2015

Stemming from recent interactions with Victoria's public oral health provider (DHSV), Mike Hubbard was invited to talk about the Chalky Teeth problem at DHSV's regional health conference held in Wangaratta. Valuable feedback was obtained about the practical challenges faced by those at the coal-face in the public health sector.

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Aussie hygienists endorse D3G

January, 2015

Australia's peak body for dental hygienists (Dental Hygienists' Association of Australia) has now joined the D3 family, complementing the presence of their therapist colleagues (ADOHTA). We thank DHAA for their endorsement and look forward to working together.

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2014

Glossy copies of Sam's storybook available now

December, 2014

Since airing the commemorative copy last August (see website launch report, under Events), the "glossy print" version of Sam's storybook has attracted praise as a valuable adjunct to the free digital versions, which can be viewed online or downloaded for printing. It appears we are not alone in enjoying the pleasure of holding (and smelling?) a real book, and flipping through its shiny pages. So, we are now making glossy print copies available in exchange for a donation to D3G (A$4 per copy plus delivery for bulk orders). Please email d3-sam@thed3group.org to order.

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Middle East dentists exposed to D3G

December, 2014

Rami Farah, a longtime Molar Hypomin researcher and D3G supporter from New Zealand (see here) is now spreading D3G's message across the Middle East. This month Rami is delivering lectures about Molar Hypomin in Saudi Arabia (his new homebase) and Jordan, incorporating a video introduction about D3G from director Mike Hubbard. Thanks Rami – we are thrilled to see D3G's reach being extended in this way.

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Major milestone for the D3G website

December, 2014

The "one million hits" milestone was passed in November, reflecting steady usage that continues to climb (currently averaging 160 visits per day). All audience sections (KIDS, FAMILIES, COMMUNITY, PRACTITIONER, RESEARCHER) are being accessed strongly, suggesting a diverse user base. And Sam's storybook has now been downloaded more than 3,400 times. Clearly, with this amount and diversity of traffic in just over a year since launch, www.thed3group.org is helping many people around the world.

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Sam's storybook features at therapists' conference

October, 2014

Complementing a lecture by D3G co-director, David Manton, the South Australian & Northern Territories branch of ADOHTA kindly sponsored a copy of Sam's storybook for all delegates at their annual conference in Adelaide. This move caps a recent groundswell of interest in D3G by the therapist community, as evidenced by numerous requests for website referral cards and membership. D3G thanks ADOHTA-SANT for this pioneering step and the allied donation.

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Bite magazine article on D3G

September, 2014

Instigator and co-director of D3G, Mike Hubbard, was interviewed by Bite magazine's Chris Sheedy about his vision and experiences in establishing D3G as a translational research and education network. This new article relays how "the D3 family" approach is steadily overcoming a variety of longstanding barriers, complementing an earlier outline of Hubbard's thoughts about D3G.

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NZ Dental Students endorse D3G

September, 2014

Naturally we all hope that the next generation of dental professionals have a better understanding of D3 issues than their predecessors. An added bonus of the 2014 Wrigley project was that the NZ Dental Students Association became endorsers of the D3G website initiative. We look forward to working collaboratively with NZDSA on future educational projects.

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D3G lands another two Wrigley grants

September, 2014

For the second year running,D3G has won funding support from the Wrigley Company Foundation's Community Service Grants in Australia and NZ. This year's "Student Power" project took the Chalky Teeth campaign to dentistry and therapy students in both countries, providing them with a glossy copy of Sam's storybook, plus a sample of the new website referral cards and Colgate-D3G reward stickers. Our thanks to Marilyn Owen and Alejandra Hernandez (Oz) and Bernadette Drummond, Omar Alsabiry and Erin Mahoney (NZ) for fronting these projects, and the many other volunteers and dental school representatives that made this promotion possible.

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New website referral cards released

September, 2014

Having distributed 16,000 of the original "professional look" business cards, D3G decided it was time to better serve our main target audience. The new "family-friendly" card features the Sam and Toothy characters from www.thed3group.org. Our thanks to D3G designer, Sharon Dunn, for this colourful new addition to the D3 family, and to Julie Barker (President, ADOHTA) for suggesting it. The new cards are available by emailing secretary@thed3group.org.

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D3G PhD student gives lectures in South America

August, 2014

Vidal Perez, a Chilean paediatric dentist studying for PhD at the University of Melbourne, has returned from a 3-week tour of Uruguay, Brasil and his home country, delivering 9 lectures to diverse audiences (2 dental conferences, 2 paediatric dentistry societies, staff and postgraduates at 4 universities). Great interest was received in the general concept of research translation, as exemplified by D3G, as well as the specific translational approach used by Vidal to investigate the pathogenesis of Molar Hypomin. The tour culminated with a 20-minute interview televised by ChileGlobal, which took our D3 research+education message to an international Latin audience. Our thanks to Vidal's hosts and travel sponsors for making this important exposure possible.

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Colgate and D3G collaborate to produce children's reward stickers

August, 2014

Early in the D3 project, several members said it would be nice for "Hypomin kids" to have their own "special reward" stickers and so this prospect was embedded in the website and Sam's storybook. Pleasingly, the "Colgate ladies" in Sydney agreed and suggested a design based on D3G's "Toothy Scientist" giving an oral hygiene message. This vision was brought to life by our graphic designer, Sharon Dunn, respecting the "rules" developed for educational+marketing brochures (i.e. avoiding exclusivity and D3G endorsement of particular products; see December 2013 news). We thank Susan Cartwright, Lenore Tuckerman and Sarah Raphael from Colgate for collaborating on this great addition to the D3 toolbox, and Colgate Australasia for sponsorship of a substantial print run.

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Kiwi therapists endorse D3G

March, 2014

Further acknowledgement of the key role played by therapists in identifying "D3 children" has come from D3G's latest endorsement, the NZ Dental and Oral Health Therapists. We welcome NZDOHT to the D3 family and look forward to working together on shared educational interests.

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2013

GC and D3G team up to produce educational brochures

December, 2013

In a pioneering "D3-family effort", two educational brochures were developed collaboratively by GC and D3G this year. Targeting dental professionals and Molar Hypomin families respectively, this multilevel education+marketing campaign was designed to be a "4-way win" (i.e. benefiting families, practitioners, GC and D3G). To avoid any suggestion that D3G endorses GC products, both brochures clearly endorse D3G educational resources (rather than the other way round) and are being produced and distributed by GC. D3G hopes that, by making its educational content available non-exclusively to companies and other "distributors", a consistent message will be relayed to the public, politicians and healthcare professions alike. We thank Stephen Haynes and Alexandra Sbaraini at GC for helping develop suitable "rules of engagement" and then producing documents that honour the "look and feel" of D3G. Independent contributions from several D3G members are also acknowledged.

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World peak for paediatric dentistry endorses D3G

November, 2013

D3G was thrilled to receive endorsement from the International Association of Paediatric Dentists, which represents over 15,000 members from 59 children's dentistry societies worldwide. D3G members have played leadership roles in IAPD over many years, including hosting the 2005 Congress in Sydney. We salute their contributions for engendering global respect of D3G's social mission, and particularly thank IAPD President Eduardo Alcaino for prioritising this key endorsement.

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Kiwi orthodontists endorse D3G

November, 2013

Hot on the heels of their trans-Tasman colleagues, the NZ Association of Orthodontists has kindly added their endorsement of D3G's educational website and Chalky Teeth campaign. Welcome to the D3 family NZAO.

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Aussie orthodontists endorse D3G

October, 2013

Better recognition of the intricate interrelationships between Molar Hypomin and orthodontics is a central plank of D3Gs educational mission. Consequently, D3G was pleased to have the Australian Orthodontic Society endorse its website initiative. We look forward to working collaboratively with ASO on research and educational areas holding mutual advantage.

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Aussie therapists endorse D3G

September, 2013

Recognising the crucial "early detection" role that dental and oral health therapists play with D3s in children and adolescents, D3G was honoured to have their Australian peak body (ADOHTA) endorse our website initiative and offer collaborative assistance with ongoing developments (including kiddie stickers and family-friendly referral cards). We look forward to further interactions with this important branch of the dental healthcare family. 

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D3G lands two Wrigley grants

September, 2013

D3G has won funding support from the Wrigley Company Foundation's Community Service Grants for its website rollout activities in Australia and NZ. Drawing on voluntary inputs from the large student membership in Melbourne, our ADAF-Wrigley project brings "student power" to the promotion and further development of D3G's educational resource. Likewise, the NZDA-Wrigley project will boost Kiwi awareness through distribution of promotional materials. Our thanks to Marilyn Owen and Daniel Cocker (Oz) and Erin Mahoney (NZ) for fronting these projects.

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A special patron for D3G

August 24, 2013

A closely kept surprise for those attending the D3G launch event was news that research pioneer Grace Suckling has agreed to be D3G's patron. D3G co-director Mike Hubbard outlined how, as "doyen of the DDE era", Grace made huge contributions to the D3 field, including the first diagnostic index for "Developmental Defects of Enamel" (DDE index) and publication of 29 research papers spanning a remarkably broad range of science (e,g, epidemiology, pathogenesis, biophysics). Still going strong after 91 years, Grace was interviewed for the event by D3G-NZ rep, Erin Mahoney (video). Pursuing its translational mission, D3G plans to bring more of Grace's fabulous and oft-overlooked contributions to the forefront shortly.

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Launch of Chalky Teeth, website and medico-dental initiatives

August 24, 2013

After more than 3 years' gestation, D3G's online education resource was finally launched officially by MRUFD benefactor Maria Myers. Adding excitement, paediatrician Sharon Goldfeld announced the intention of two Australasian Royal Colleges (Physicians, Dental Surgeons) to collaborate with D3G on preventive aspects of "D3-caries". And as icing on the cake, unfurling of our public-friendly "Chalky Teeth" campaign gained worldwide attention. For further information, see the three reports under Past Events.

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Royal Dental College endorses D3G

August, 2013

D3G was honoured to receive endorsement for its website initiative from the Royal Australasian College of Dental Surgeons. This liason is pleasing at multiple levels, noting RACD's interactions with RACP on child oral health (see news item below) and that many RACDS members have supported development of the D3G website. Also enticing is the collaborative interest expressed by RACDS in adding assessment capabilities to some sections of the website, with a view to boosting utility for practitioner education (cf. possibility of a terminology test).

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RACP Oral Health update

August, 2013

In 2012, the Royal Australasian College of Physicians (Paediatrics and Child Health Division) released a pioneering position statement about oral health in children and young people. Following input from D3G, the document has now been extended to cover D3s and associated risks including caries. The updated strategy document, which is supported by the Royal College of Dental Surgeons, can be downloaded from here or directly. This initial interaction with the RACP is a key milestone for D3G, particularly noting the all-important medical aspects of Molar Hypomin and ensuing prospects for involving medical and allied health practitioners in preventive interventions.

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Dental associations endorse D3G

August, 2013

Ahead of the official website launch in late August, D3G was honoured to receive endorsements from the national bodies for general dentistry in Australia and NZ: the Australian Dental Association and the NZ Dental Association. We view these connections as particularly important, noting the key role that dental GPs play in early detection of D3s and interception before "the rot" (caries) sets in.

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Paediatric dentists endorse D3G

August, 2013

Following its pre-launch in April, the D3G website initiative was privileged to receive endorsements from both Australasian peak bodies for paediatric dentistry: the Australasian Academy of Paediatric Dentistry and the Australian and NZ Society of Paediatric Dentistry. With members of both organisations having made invaluable contributions during website development, we look forward to further collaborative activities.

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Website referral cards distributed

August, 2013

To help connect needy families with our education resource, D3G has developed website "business cards" for practitioners to hand out as a modern alternative to patient brochures (which are more costly, less readily updated and offer only a fraction of the information on the website). To grow awareness within the profession, these cards are being distributed at conferences and by mailouts. We are grateful to the branch secretaries of ANZSPD for their help in distributing cards to over 300 members across Australia and NZ, and to our financial supporters that enable these cards to be provided free. To request cards, see here, and to download the associated flyer click here

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Companies support D3G rollout

August, 2013

As acknowledged on the homepage, the Australasian branches of three multinational companies have become "supportive family members" of D3G by subscribing to D3G's cross-sector-family philosophy and donating generously towards the website rollout activities. Joining long-time supporters Dentsply and Colgate are GC Corporation and A-dec. Additionally, Acteon made a helpful donation towards costs of the launch function. We look forward to further collaborative efforts in education, research and advocacy, and welcome other companies to join the D3G family (for further info please contact D3G's Directors).

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First severity index for Molar Hypomin

August 12, 2013

In what turned out to be a herculean research project, Melbourne DCD student Kelly Oliver undertook the first "real-world" testing of the Molar Hypomin Severity Index (MHSI) developed earlier by Louise Messer and colleagues. By teaming up with five specialist paediatric dental practices, an impressive 283 cases were gathered and characterised in detail (e.g. lesion colour, location, breakdown, restorations and sensitivity). The real-life spectrum of presentations was found to be well-captured by the MHSI, suggesting this diagnostic index will serve as a useful guide in the clinical management of Molar Hypomin. (read more)

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Complex properties of Hypomin enamel

August 12, 2013

Having treated members to several previews at D3G meetings, Felicity Crombie has now advanced to publishing three reports from her PhD investigations of Hypomin molars. Firstly, using a variety of lab tests (chemical and physical), she found that not only was Hypomin enamel strikingly different than normal, but also that its clinical appearance and physical properties weren't tightly correlated. (read more) This perplexing variability was echoed in two lab studies of treatment options, where resin infiltration was found to "work" in some cases but not others (read more) and treatment with caries-remineralising solution (CPP-ACFP) led to varied improvements in hardness of Hypomin enamel (read more). Like all good PhD projects, this one opens the door to many intriguing opportunities for follow-up research.

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Website pre-launch

April 2013

After three years gestation, D3G's new website was unveiled to the dental community at annual meetings of specialist paediatric dentists (Australasian Academy of Paediatric Dentistry) and general practitioners (35th Australian Dental Congress).These events generated much positive feedback and a major surge in website traffic. For more information see the separate report above (under Events).

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Prevalence of Molar Hypomin in Iraqi children

March, 2013

In a remarkably productive PhD project, Aghareed Ghanim characterised many facets of Molar Hypomin in her home country, Iraq. Exploiting her experience as a paediatric dentist, Aghareed examined the second primary molars and permanent (adult) teeth in a large group of children from Mosul City. MIH was found to affect about 19% of permanent dentitions and 7% of second primary molars (read more here and here). Medical history analysis suggested causal associations with illness during infancy but no single factor was identified as a potential cause of MIH (read more here and here). Affected adult molars were found to have higher incidence of caries and to require at least twice as much restorative treatment as unaffected molars (read more here and here). In a prior survey of Iraqi dental academics, a vast majority reported they encountered MIH on a regular basis (read more).

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Profiling the protein composition of hypomineralised enamel

March, 2013

Using clinical proteomics, two D3G research teams have characterised Molar Hypomin lesions at protein level for the first time. Dunedin-based workers (Farah, Monk, Swain & Drummond) found that discoloured Molar Hypomin enamel had much higher amounts of protein than normal. Some of the proteins identified are typically associated with serum, leading the team to suggest a mechanism that could help explain the abnormal protein and mineral contents of Molar Hypomin enamel (read more).

A multidisciplinary team from Melbourne (Mangum, Crombie, Kilpatrick, Manton & Hubbard) also found high protein contents and went on to show that lesions with intact surfaces contained different types of protein than those with broken surfaces. These findings enabled the team to discriminate serum-derived proteins from those originating in saliva, so leading to novel insights about the pathogenesis of Molar Hypomin (read more).

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2011

Comparing D3 prevalence in primary and permanent teeth

2011

Kim Seow and colleagues from Brisbane have compared the prevalence of D3s in baby (primary) and adult (secondary) teeth of school children. They found that the primary teeth had almost half as many enamel defects as secondary teeth, and that these were mostly demarcated opacities with about 1 in 7 exhibiting surface breakdown. These findings confirm that Hypomin lesions could contribute substantially to caries risk in the primary dentition. (read more)

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Mineral density analysis of Hypomin enamel

2011

Rami Farah and colleagues from Dunedin investigated Molar Hypomin lesions of varying severity using X-ray microtomography. They took particular care over density calibration, so enhancing their quantitative interpretations. Mineral density was found to vary according to position on the tooth, depth within the lesion, and relationship to developmental lines. (read more)

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Prevalence of Molar Hypomin in NZ schoolchildren

2011

In a world-first study asking whether ethnicity influences the prevalence of Molar Hypomin, Wellington researchers (Mahoney & Morrison) found equal rates in children representing Maori, Pacific Island and NZ European groups. The overall prevalence (15%) and heightened risk for caries (up to 12-fold increase in DMFT) puts this NZ subpopulation in line with reports from other countries. (read more)

A follow-up study comparing children from a central-city environment with "out-of-towners" revealed a somewhat higher prevalence for city kids (about 19% had Molar Hypomin, vs 15% as above) but no obvious association with socioeconomic status was found. Compared with Hypomineralisation, Hypoplastic defects were an uncommon finding (affecting less than 1% of kids). (read more)

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2009

Aetiological review of Molar Hypomin

2009

Felicity Crombie (then a PhD student) and her Melbourne colleagues critically reviewed previous reports about suspected causes of Molar Hypomin. Although specific causes were unable to be established, some potential risk factors were identified. Overall, the level of evidence was found to be low and the need for long-term prospective epidemiological studies was highlighted. (read more)

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Risk factors for Molar Hypomin in Western Australia

2009

Following from his prevalence study (see below), Peter Arrow investigated the potential risk factors associated with Molar Hypomin in Western Australian schoolchildren. Children with an infection during the neonatal period were found to be over six times more likely to have demarcated enamel defects. (read more)

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2008

A spectrum of Molar Hypomin presentations

2008

A retrospective study of 182 children with Molar Hypomin seen in a Melbourne paediatric dental practice led Chawla, Silva and Messer to describe an “MIH spectrum”. That is, cases ranged from mild, where only the molars were affected, to severe with involvement of both incisors and molars. Aetiological associations with combinations of antibiotic use, ear infections, fevers, perinatal conditions and other illnesses in the child’s first three years of life were also found. (read more)

These data were also used to develop a Hypomineralisation Severity Index intended to help clinicians determine the best management options for Molar Hypomin. (read more)

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Molar Hypomin awareness amongst ANZSPD practitioners

2008

The knowledge, clinical experience and opinions of specialist practitioners in regards to Molar Hypomin have been assessed by Felicity Crombie and colleagues. Questioning members of the Australia and New Zealand Society for Paediatric Dentistry revealed that Molar Hypomin was widely recognized and posed significant clinical problems. A majority of respondents felt a need for further research in this area. (read more)

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Prevalence of Molar Hypomin in Australian children

2008

Peter Arrow reported the first comprehensive study of Molar Hypomin prevalence in Australian schoolchildren (n= 511). Investigating a Western Australian population, 22% were found to have demarcated opacities on at least one first permanent molar, a figure that is somewhat higher than the average reported elsewhere in the world. (read more)

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